Interviews

Eamon’s Album Of The Week: MetaL MetaL by Meta Meta

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Every week of this outdoor Mister Sunday season, we’ll be asking Eamon or Justin to highlight an album that they’ll be playing in full at the beginning of the day. This week, it’s Eamon’s turn. He’s chosen MetaL MetaL by the Brazilian band Meta Meta. This is what he has to say about it.

Last year I took a trip to Brazil. One evening in Rio, I met up with my friend Millos Kaiser from Selvagem, and he took us to a favela to see a band I’d never heard of. The favelas in Rio are slowly becoming safer places, and quite a few now see a regular trade in tourism from more adventurous travelers. Heading into one for the first time with a Rio native who has impeccable music taste was a real treat.

The band we saw was called Meta Meta. They were playing in a fairly nondescript warehouse space with pretty bad acoustics, but the night was a special one because they had such an incredible sound, and the crowd watching them was a really great combination of kids from the favela and people from the creative and artistic communities in Rio.

Meta Meta’s music is heavily influenced by a Bahia-based Afro-Brazilian religion that has links back to west Africa and the slavery days.  You can hear religious wailing throughout the record underpinned by moments of afro-beat, free jazz and punk. It’s a truly remarkable fusion. (And Tony Allen makes an appearance behind the drum set on a few of the tracks, to boot.)

The record I’ll be playing at 3pm on Sunday was the last LP they had for sale after the gig. I bought it directly from Juçara Marçal the lead singer, a very charismatic and talented lady.

Justin’s Album Of The Week: Tempo by Salvatore

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Every week of this outdoor Mister Sunday season, we’ll be asking Eamon or Justin to highlight an album that they’ll be playing in full at the beginning of the day. This week, it’s Justin’s turn. He’s chosen Salvatore’s Tempo album. This is what he has to say about it.

When I got out of college in 2003, I dabbled in music journalism. Those were the days when PR companies would still send out CDs to writers, and it didn’t take long before I would get overwhelmed by piles of CDs. Luckily this album was one of the first I got, when it still felt really special to get new music in the mail for free.

What made it all the more special is how psyched I was on the music. (I quickly discovered that most promos were mediocre, so finding one I loved in the early stages was like hitting a home run at my first at-bat.)  Tempo became a staple album for me. It still reminds me of that time in my life, riding back from Beach Five at Robert Moses State Park in my friend Vance’s Jetta with the window open and my best friends in the back seat.

The music is expansive, with large debts to krautrock and post-punk (when I interviewed them, the Salvatore guys told me that they loved Liquid Liquid; it recently dawned on me that they probably named the band after the Liquids’ lead singer and percussionist Salvatore Principato). Beyond the homages to the past, the record also felt very contemporary. You could tell they listened to a lot of sample-based electronic music. I don’t think sampling was involved in the records, but the drummer played repetitive breaks as if they’d been sampled. They were clearly also shoegaze fans. Guitar lines would only be a few notes long, but they’d hang in the air for ages.

I recently pulled the album out, and it sounds as good as ever. I’m really excited to play it for you Sunday.

Eamon’s Album Of The Week: Jazz Jamaica by Ernest Ranglin

Every week of this outdoor Mister Sunday season, we’ll be asking Eamon or Justin to highlight an album that they’ll be playing in full at the beginning of the day. This week, it’s Eamon’s turn. He’s chosen Ernest Ranglin’s Jazz Jamaica record. This is what he has to say about it.

On a recent tour of the UK, Justin and I dropped into Idle Hands, a really nice record store in Bristol where we did a spot of record shopping. (There’s actually a video of us talking about a few of our picks from the store in case you’re interested.)
One of the records I picked up was Jazz Jamaica by Ernest Ranglin, and it’s that record we’ll be kicking proceedings off with this Sunday. The record initially caught my eye for the cover, which was clearly Jamaican but suggestive of a different kind of sound than reggae, ska, dance hall, etc.

As the title suggests, it’s actually a jazz record – notably, a jazz guitar record. Ernest Ranglin was a prolific guitar player in the reggae and ska worlds, integral to the early releases on Chris Blackwell’s Island Records, and his progressive style in the early 60s is credited with starting what would become know as ska. You can read a whole lot more in his bio.
It’s a really elegant record, with an obvious Caribbean swing to it but at the same time, it’s unmistakeably a jazz record. I buy a lot of jazz, and recently I’ve specifically been exploring the world of jazz guitar. I’ve really grown to love this record for its unique combination of jazz playing with a Jamaican sensibility. A perfect record to ease the party in this Sunday.

A New Tradition, Starting With First Recordings by RL Burnside

RLIf you’ve ever gotten to the party early, you’ve probably heard Eamon or Justin play a full album or two. We’ve got a pretty nice sound system, and it’s a treat to hear a good long player over the PA before the dancefloor fills up. This year we’re making something official of our casual tradition with one of the guys selecting an album in advance and telling a little about why they’re going to play it. Justin’s taking the first turn. The record he’s chosen is RL Burnside’s First Recordings:

Back in October of 2011, I took a trip through the south that landed me in Clarksdale, Mississippi and Memphis, Tennessee. Before then I had the cursory blues knowledge that any music fan might, but the stops in those two towns made me fall deeply in love with the music. (I made a short mix of some of my first blues infatuations back in January in 2012 in case you’re interested.) Since then, I’ve grown my collection, and I’ve become particularly interested in the blues as dance music.

In its heyday, the blues were played in many ways and served many purposes, but my favorite recordings are the ones that put me in a trance, where the guitars drone and the vocals punctuate. Even when there’s no percussive elements in a recording, you can almost hear how dancers would’ve clapped along or stomped their feet to fill in the space.

The first recordings of RL Burnside contain some of the hardest dance tunes I’ve heard in the blues. Absolutely crushing stuff. (I played “Skinny Blues” at peak time at one of the most recent Mister Sundays.) Even the songs that aren’t dancers are full of groove and swagger. I can’t help but nod my head through the whole record.

The story of how this album was recorded is also very cool. George Mitchell, one of the great blues scholars and field recorders, was in Mississippi in 1968, searching for unknown players. He was led to RL by Othar Turner, a legendary blues man himself. When Mitchell arrived at Burnside’s small home, his wife, nine of his ten kids, and a few local friends were squeezed inside. Mitchell took a seat on their couch, and RL started up. After the first song, George Mitchell, mesmerized, hit record on his tape machine and captured the album we’ll listen to Sunday.

If you’re interested in any more of the story, feel free to come to the booth and ask to see the jacket. (I also have the first issue of some of the recordings, which has a little more back story. I’ll bring that, too.) I’m really looking forward to playing it for you – and, selfishly, taking yet another opportunity to listen to it myself!

–Justin Carter

Mister Boiler Room

We’ve teamed up with Boiler Room to start a regular Mister Saturday Night show. It’s a big first for MSN and Boiler Room – for us, because, well, we’ve never done a TV show; and for Boiler Room because the focus is almost exclusively on dancers, kind of like a sweatier Soul Train. The first episode was shot at The Lab, a regular NYC House Dance session. You can watch the show above, and you can check a background interview with Eamon, Justin and a couple of the dancers from The Lab here.

For anyone interested in the tunes in the episode, here’s the full tracklist:

01. Freedom Williams – Voice Of Freedom (Bass Hit Dub) – Columbia
02. Eamon Harkin – Innit – Wurst
03. Aphex Twin – Windowlicker – Warp
04. Farm Boy – Jackin’ Me Around (House Mix) – Trax
05. Trankilou – Atom Funk – Kif Recordings
06. Kerri Chandler – The Old Office – Downtown 161
07. DJ Duke – Can You Feel It (Pump The Parade Mix) – Power Music Trax
08. Phyllis Nelson – I Like You – Carrere
09. White Label – White Label
10. MFSB – Love Is The Message (DJ Romain Mix) – ITH Records
11. Michael Watford – As (U.S. Dub Mix) – Soundmen on Wax
12. Omar S – The Sh*t Baby – FXHE

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  • Upcoming Parties & Gigs

    Friday, July 31st // Eamon Harkin with JG Wilkes at Belfast Music Club in Belfast, Ireland

    Saturday, August 1st, Daytime // Eamon Harkin with JG Wilkes at The Beatyard in Dun Laoghaire, Ireland

    Saturday, August 1st, Nighttime // Eamon Harkin with JG Wilkes at Twisted Pepper in Dublin, Ireland

    Sunday, August 2nd // Mister Sunday with Justin Carter Solo All Day // at Industry City // all ages // more info and advance tickets

    Sunday, August 2nd // Mister Sunday London with Eamon Harkin Solo All Day // at Oval Space // all ages // more info and advance tickets

    Sunday, August 9th // Mister Sunday with Eamon Harkin and Justin Carter // at Industry City // all ages // tickets and more info

    Friday, August 14th // Eamon Harkin and Justin Carter play Dig Deeper in LA, CA // more info

    Sunday, August 16th // Mister Sunday with Eamon Harkin Solo All Day // at Industry City // all ages // tickets and more info

    Sunday, August 23rd // Mister Sunday with Justin Carter and Duane Harriott of Devin Dare, Desiree West and Bim Marx // at Industry City // all ages // tickets and more info

    Sunday, August 30th // Mister Sunday with Justin Carter Solo All Day // at Industry City // all ages // tickets and more info

    Sunday, September 6th // Mister Sunday with Justin Carter and Eamon Harkin // at Industry City // all ages // tickets and more info

    Sunday, September 13th // Mister Sunday with Justin Carter and Eamon Harkin // at Industry City // all ages // tickets and more info

    Saturday, September 19th // Eamon Harkin at Le Bleury Bar à Vinyle, Montreal, Canada

    Sunday, September 20th // Mister Sunday with Justin Carter Solo All Day // at Industry City // all ages // tickets and more info

    Sunday, September 27th // Mister Sunday with Justin Carter and Eamon Harkin // at Industry City // all ages // tickets and more info

    Saturday, October 3rd // Mister Saturday Night with Justin Carter, Eamon Harkin and very special guest Gunnar Haslam // at Silent Barn // 10p - 4a // all ages // tickets and more info coming soon

    Sunday, October 4th // Mister Sunday with Justin Carter and Eamon Harkin // at Industry City // all ages // tickets and more info

    Sunday, October 11th // Mister Sunday with Justin Carter and Eamon Harkin // at Industry City // all ages // tickets and more info

    Sunday, October 18th // Mister Sunday with Justin Carter and Eamon Harkin // at Industry City // all ages // tickets and more info