Author: Justin Carter

Looking Back On 2014: Justin Carter

Here We Go Magic’s A Different Ship

So I’m starting my look back on 2014 with a record from 2012. Here’s why: Beyond trying to stay somewhat on top of what’s happening in current dance music (which I can barely manage), I tend not to pay much much attention to new releases. It’s nice, because I end up discovering things through conversations, record store trips and other happenstance. All that is to say that my look back on 2014 is more about my own musical experiences this year than it is about music that actually got released this year.

Anyway, no matter when it came out, Here We Go Magic’s A Different Ship is brilliant. The lyrics,  song structures, singing, playing and, not least of all, the production (courtesy of Nigel Godrich), are impeccable. Every song got stuck in my head at some point, and the title track of the album (above) graduated quickly to my favorite-tracks-of-all-time list. I liked the album so much I bought it digitally so I didn’t have to stop listening when I left the record player. There’s only one other album I bought digitally this year…

D’Angelo and the Vanguard’s Black Messiah

Not only did I buy this on iTunes the night it came out, I pre-ordered the vinyl, bought a CD as a gift, AND, when I found out it was available for download as a wav (the format recommended by Russ Elevado), I bought it again.

It only came out two weeks ago, but I’ve already listened to Black Messiah plenty enough times to know it’s one of the best things I’ve heard, not just this year, but ever. Sonically genius, lyrically powerful, socially relevant, it gives me goosebumps just thinking about it. Also amazing is that the album feels so directly connected to Voodoo, while at the same time, completely fresh. If you haven’t gotten caught up in the hype yet, please do.

Baba Stiltz’s “Palats”

A permanent fixture in my record bag the moment I heard it. What a tune. An ebullient melody and warm drums that build until BOOM! CRAZY PITCHED DOWN AIR RAID SIREN! Go Baba, go.

Universal Togetherness Band’s Upcoming Album on Numero

This Universal Togetherness Band album isn’t coming out until the end of January, but since my best buddy, Jon Kirby, is doing the heavy lifting for the record, I had the pleasure of getting an early copy. If you listen to the Beats In Space or NTS Radio shows that Eamon and I did, you’ll hear a couple of the tracks.

The album was recorded between 1979 and 1982 and then totally forgotten about, never mixed and never released. As they somehow do, Numero has unearthed it. The album an amazing concoction of raw modern soul and disco, and though it’s almost thoroughly a record of dance songs, you can listen to it from end to end. Pre-order it, and if you don’t like it, I’LL give you your money back.

HVCK’s “Domino”

Great new music from Adelaide. Man I love this.

Photay’s “Illusion of Seclusion”

TJ, who helps us run the label and the parties, hipped me to this one, and I’m so glad he did. Photay is a 21-year-old, New York-based producer who’s spent time in Guinea, where he clearly picked up a thing or two about polyrhythm. I can’t wait to hear more.

Mississippi Records’ Reissue of the American Folk Music Anthology

Moses Asch‘s original intention with all Folkways records was that they should never, ever go out of print. And while this seminal collection of American folk music was only truly unavailable for ten years, until Mississipi reissued the collection on vinyl this year, the only wax copies you could get cost upwards of $100 apiece. What a treat to have the full, three-volume collection (plus one more volume that only surfaced in 2000) of songs that launched modern music, along with reprints of the original book Harry Smith made to accompany the set. It’s an education, but it’s a very fun one.

**A highly recommended companion piece is this Folkways podcast series, specifically episodes four to six, which go into great detail on Harry Smith and Moe Asch’s making of the Anthology.

U’s “The Kids Will Take Care Of Themselves”

When we did Beats In Space, Tim Sweeney played this, and it blew me away. Crazy good slow house.

Solaris’s “Music Mind”

A slow disco jam from 1980. It starts off as a mellow head-nodder, but by about four-and-a-half minutes in, the string section starts to stab, and I go nuts. I don’t remember how I found this song this year, but I’m so glad I did.

718Playing 718 Sessions

I’ll spare you the full history, but for anyone who hasn’t already heard me go on about it, Body and Soul played a huge part in my life. Danny Krivit, a B&S resident, has run another party called 718 Sessions for over ten years now, and it was a real honor that he asked Eamon and me to play there this month. The night lived up to all my fantasies, an amazing group of dancers, many of whom I recognized from my days on the Body and Soul dancefloor, intermingling with the Mister Saturday Night and Mister Sunday regulars. Crazy good energy, so special. It’s a night I’ll remember as long as I live.

Mister Sunday

us-0608-598513-333445-backThe last outdoor Mister Sunday of the season is this weekend.

Our hours are from 3pm to 9pm as usual, and it costs $15 to get in. You can buy advance tickets here.

Remember those rules for the dancefloor! Here’s the scoop:

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A FEW RULES FOR OUR DANCEFLOOR:

1. Please don’t take photos.
2. Please don’t smoke.
3. Please don’t text or make calls or any of that stuff.

You can do all these things off of the dancefloor, but when you’re inside the speakers, get down.

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Finally, here are directions and some answers to other questions you might have:

If you want to use Google Maps to get directions, the closest address to our entrance is 241 37th Street, Brooklyn. The N, R and D trains stop at 36th Street, two blocks from the party. Both the N and D run express, even on the weekend. It takes less than ten minutes to get here from Atlantic Terminal on both of those trains. The R train runs local and connects with the F and G at 4th Ave and 9th. If you’re riding a bike, the easiest, safest way is to use 5th Avenue. Once you get to 36th Street, just go down the hill, and you’re a short coast away.

OTHER IMPORTANT THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT SUNDAYS

Kids under 18 go free with as long as they’re accompanied by a grown-up, and dogs are welcome as long as they’re on a leash. We take credit cards at the bar. The closest ATM is in the deli on the corner of 3rd Ave and 36th Street. No outside drinks are allowed, but fear not: we have beer, sangria, water, and lemonade. In order to drink beer and sangria, you’ll need a wristband. You’ll be given a wristband at the door as long as your ID says you’re of age.

The music ends at 9pm, and we close the space a little later, so if you want to hang and have a drink after the tunes, you can. Before you leave, please throw all your trash and recycling in the appropriate bins so the neighbors’ front stoops aren’t junked up, and on your way home, keep your voices low so that the folks in the neighborhood can have a little peace and quiet. They’re really nice for having us around, and we want to stay in their good graces so we can keep bringing you Mister Sunday.

Finally, have an awesome time.

Sylvester Is My Hero

I played this song on Sunday, and it’s put me on a major Sylvester kick this week. Dude was exactly who and what he wanted to be: tall, strong and physically imposing, delicately beautiful, firey like a pentecostal preacher, flashy like a disco queen. There was and has been no one like him since he died from AIDS complications at the way-too-young age of forty-one in the late 80s.

His version of ‘Southern Man’ isn’t just the definitive version of Neil Young’s song because of how musically perfect it is; it’s because it was UNBELIEVABLY ballsy for a six-foot-something black man in women’s clothes to open his DEBUT record, in 1973 no less, by wailing out these lyrics in the strongest falsetto anyone’s ever heard: “Southern man better keep your head. Don’t forget what your good book said. Southern change gonna come at last. Now your crosses are burning fast. / I saw cotton, and I saw black. Tall white mansions and little shacks. Southern man, when will you pay them back?”

Sylvester is my hero.

Give It Back

MSN_2011_joyorbison2Hey, folks.

This is Justin Carter. Eamon and I have some downtime between parties and thought it would be a good time to let you know about something new we’re starting.

In December we read a New York Times story about an eleven-year-old homeless girl named Dasani Coates, and it hit us hard. Not only did the little girl and her family live in squalor; that squalor existed less than a mile from 12-turn-13, Gowanus Grove and our own homes.

We’ve always thought of our parties as opportunities to cultivate a community, and we’ve felt a great responsibility to do just that. But reading about Dasani made us think about our responsibility to communities beyond Mister Saturday Night.

With that in mind, we’ve decided that from now on, we’re making giving back part of what we do. We’re starting by giving ten percent of Mister Saturday Night and Mister Sunday’s net profits in 2014 to The Robin Hood Foundation, arguably the most effective organization combatting poverty here in New York City. (For a very compelling argument on effective giving, check out Peter Singer’s TED Talk.)

We’ve decided to announce this publicly because we believe that in addition to our ability to raise money, we also have an opportunity to start a conversation about giving back. Just as your participation is vital to the culture and quality of our parties, it’s also integral to improving our larger communities – in Brooklyn, New York City and beyond.

Eamon and I are not wealthy philanthropists, non-profit board members or anything extraordinary; we’re just a couple guys who DJ and throw parties. But we believe that we still have a responsibility to help people in need, and we hope our decision encourages others to take action as well.

If you want to ask us any questions, or if you’ve got any ideas to share, please get in touch. Thanks for taking the time to read, and thanks, most of all, for being the most important part of what we do.

Looking Back On 2013: Justin Carter

As has become tradition, Eamon and I attempt to wrap a bow around the musical year that was with our Best Of lists. As usual, I had a hard time limiting my list to things that came out in 2013, or even limiting it to just music; that Turrell piece made me feel like I’d just heard a symphony, and Herbie Hancock’s use of the vocoder on Sunlight is still yet to be matched. (No matter how hard Daft Punk tried this year.)

Dirg Gerner’s Dirg Gerner EP on Eglo
I can’t say enough about this record. Beautiful melody after beautiful melody, warm production, amazing songs. I played it and played it, but it never got old.

James Turrell’s Aten Reign at the Guggenheim
Last year I waxed on about Philip Glass and Robert Wilson’s Einstein on the Beach. At the time Wilson said, “You don’t have to understand anything. It’s a work where you can go and get lost. That’s the idea.”

Aten Reign, James Turrell’s all-encompassing light installation inside the Guggenheim rotunda, was the visual art equivalent. There was no focal point, which is kind of like having an opera with no plot. It was beautiful and impossible to capture in photo, video or anything else – nothing but experience. A total inspiration in terms of what I want for our parties.

A little note: This show is over, but Turrell has a career retrospective at the LACMA until early April, and here’s a map of all of his installations around the world.

. . . Read on

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    Mister Saturday Night or Mister Sunday parties are in bold. Non-bold listings are for Justin Carter & Eamon Harkin DJ sets.

    Sunday, April 19th // Mister Sunday Indoors with Eamon Harkin and Justin Carter // at Shea Stadium // all ages // advance tickets available here

    Sunday, May 3rd // Mister Sunday Indoors with Eamon Harkin and Justin Carter // at Shea Stadium // all ages // advance tickets available here

    Friday, June 12th // Justin Carter at Kanala in Tallinn, Estonia

    Sunday, June 14th // Mister Sunday London with Justin Carter solo all day long // at Oval Space // all ages // advance tickets available here

    Sunday, August 2nd // Mister Sunday London with Eamon Harkin solo all day long // at Oval Space // all ages // more info available here